TV REVIEW: ‘WHITE FAMOUS’ IS UNFUNNY, MISSING THE MARK ON MANY LEVELS!

White Famous is Showtime’s latest comedy starring SNL Alum, Jay Pharoah. The Entourage-styled show’s greatest sin is that it just isn’t that funny.

Floyd Mooney (Pharoah) is a black comedian fighting his way up the Hollywood ladder as part of the Los Angeles stand-up circuit. After a big-time producer unleashes a racial rant at Floyd which goes viral, Floyd books a role in one of his films. He is moving up in the world and if he plays his cards right, Floyd can be “white famous,” meaning he can achieve mainstream success.

WHITE FAMOUS Eddy Chen Showtime

The show was created by Tom Kapinos (Californication) and is loosely based on Jamie Foxx’s own rise in Hollywood from stand-up comic to A-List film star. Foxx stars as himself in the show’s opener.

Floyd has a complicated relationship with his ex, Sadie (Cleopatra Coleman) whom he clearly still loves and sometimes falls back into bed with. But she is trying to move on and her dating is torturous for him. They have a young son together (Lonnie Chavis) whom Floyd could try harder with in the parenting department.

At the heart of the show’s problem is Floyd himself, written unsympathetically, making him difficult to root for and without that feeling of engagement, things fall apart. Pharoah’s talents are wasted here. The show also misses with its hyper-masculine, and what comes across as sexist, bent.

Other than Sadie, women appear to be props for the men around them, like the naked woman lying in Jamie Foxx’s bed as he is introduced, whom he calls research. And there are only so many times you can kick around your scheming agent (Utkarsh Ambudkar). The gags get tired after the first few goes around.

The one area that might have some promise, is the progression of Floyd’s relationship with Sadie. Can it evolve into something deeper, perhaps allowing Floyd to be more vulnerable and self-reflective as both a partner and a father?

But in 2017, is a hyper-masculine show that objectifies women and lazily plays to stereotypes what people are asking for? And it’s not funny? I don’t think so.

‘WHITE FAMOUS’ AIRS ON SHOWTIME, SUNDAYS, 10 P.M ET/PT.

PHOTO: EDDY CHEN/ SHOWTIME

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